Chinese Coins on Oak Island

The Oak Island Money Pit in the media - news, press releases, tv and online.
Have you come across an interesting link? This is the place to share it.

Moderators: Jo, admiralbenbow

Postby GrailKnight7 on Wed Feb 15, 2006 11:55 pm

Thanks Vincent!

I've continued to do a little digging around with regards to these Asian coins that were found on Oak Island and I happened upon a news story from this past summer regarding alleged Chinese ruins in Cape Breton.

I'm just wondering if perhaps someone from out that way has heard anything more about this?

Here's the story from the CTV.ca news website, below.

Scott

Architect believes Chinese found Cape Breton
Updated Tue. Jun. 7 2005 8:12 AM ET

Associated Press

HALIFAX — A nine-kilometre road winds its way up an isolated mountain where a stone wall sits amid fields of wild blueberries and mayflowers. A closer look reveals a series of stone platforms.

At first glance, the scene is not an unfamiliar one in Cape Breton's sprawling wilderness.

But this one, nestled along the island's east coast, has become the latest battleground for archeologists with the startling claim it was discovered by the Chinese, long before the arrival of any European explorers.

"This is probably the most important archeological site in the world right now and it's going to change world history," Paul Chiasson, who found the site, said from his home in Toronto.

"Well before Christopher Columbus, well before the European age of discovery in the 15th century, China controlled the seas and had a major settlement on the eastern coast of North America."

Chiasson, an architect originally from Cape Breton, set off a heated debate in historical circles last month when he presented a paper in Washington outlining his belief that an armada of Chinese ships, carrying thousands of sailors, landed in Cape Breton as early as the 1300s.

Canadian and U.S. archeologists and historians have dismissed the assertion, arguing there is no evidence to support what they say is just another wild theory about North America's first foreign visitors.

"The evidence here was absolutely missing," Kirsten Seaver, an historian with a specialty in early Norse mapping, said from her home in Palo Alto, Calif.

"It just looks very strange to me that this would have anything to do with the Chinese - medieval Chinese sitting there like an island thousands of miles away from home. How would they get there? Why would they get there and why haven't we found any other traces anywhere else?

"Notoriety is a very strong motivator."

Chiasson insists the settlement is Chinese because of very distinct features he says only the Chinese would construct:

The lengthy stone wall is similar to the ones the Chinese built around their encampments.

The road leading to the site is the same, standard width of old Chinese roads.

The stone platforms are similar to ones found in the Forbidden City in Beijing.

Chiasson, 50, discovered the mysterious site more than a year ago while hiking in the area, which he is keeping a secret until it receives protected status by the province.

He says he came across a wider-than-average road that led him up the side of a steep, rocky cape, some 300 metres high. Surrounded by ocean on three sides, the cape is topped by a field and a stone wall.

Inside the three-kilometre-long wall, Chiasson found 15 rectangular platforms he believes were once the foundations for houses.

At first, he thought he had stumbled upon an old European site. But after reviewing aerial photos and sifting through stacks of history books in a Toronto library, he became convinced it was Chinese.

"There were moments when I had to leave the library because I was dumbfounded because the facts would simply pop out of the books," he said. "This will turn history on its head . . . and every day I realize how major a discovery it is."

But the find has elicited little enthusiasm among archeologists in the region, who say it is almost certainly an old farm.

"There are these kind of stone ruins all over Nova Scotia . . . and by and large, they're all just abandoned Loyalist farm sites," said Rob Ferguson, an archeologist with Parks Canada in Halifax.

"There are people who seem to take a hypothesis . . . and before you know it you have Phoenicians sailing across and Egyptians, and suddenly everyone is on your shore."

Provincial officials have said they won't explore the site because it seems unlikely it is Chinese.

David Christianson, curator of archeology at the Nova Scotia Museum, has seen the aerial photos and doubts there is anything to the claim.

"I cannot find any evidence there that would in any way support the assertion," he said. "I think he'll be disappointed. It's certainly speculative."

Chiasson scoffs at the skepticism.

"I understand the reticence on the part of the government and the museum because it is world changing and they missed it."

He has written a manuscript about the discovery and has teamed up with Gavin Menzies, who wrote the controversial book, 1421: The Year China Discovered America.

Meanwhile, they're hoping private partners will step forward with funding for an archeological dig.

The two visited the site a couple of weeks ago with an engineer and discovered more roads and a canal system, findings that bolstered their belief in its Chinese origins.

"It's either a grand hoax or a great discovery because it's nothing in between," Chiasson says.
User avatar
GrailKnight7
Digging for Diamonds
 
Posts: 527
Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2005 8:34 pm
Location: Toronto, Canada

Postby Vincent on Thu Feb 16, 2006 8:05 pm

GK7

This is amazing stuff, im not dissmissing it but it would seem odd that the chinese would make is as far as NS without leaving any traces behind on route. that said people in the past did have the uncanny habit of turning up in the strangest places.

i personaly am of the opinion that global travel is not a modern phenominon, a few years ago a french scientist found traces of nicotine and a derivative of cocaine in an egyptian mummy(circa 4000bc), problem here is that at the time of consumption of said chemicals both plants were indigenous only to south america.
a trade route may be the answer to this, but it in my mind still proves that we had the ability to travel vast distances in the ancient past, so it is quite possible that the chinese did indeed discover america,....how can say.
Quick pass me a spade! I`ve had another idea.
User avatar
Vincent
Future Tour Guide
 
Posts: 3179
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 12:29 pm
Location: Bedfordshire, England.

Postby Vincent on Thu Feb 16, 2006 8:36 pm

Like you i believe the chinese would have sailed east if exploration was on their minds, after all the spanish and the portugese went west, the open see has a lure of its own.

rounding the cape in a junk...Hmmm well maybe, just maybe!
sailing around the top of the americas....i very much doubt it.

however if evidence exsists we must keep an open mind.

as for trade routes, im with you. i once saw an article in National Geographic about a partially mummified body found in china/tibet/nepal, strange thing was he was dated to around 1400 and was dressed in tweed/tartan.
people were moving around a lot more than we think, we just havnt seen enough evidence yet to convince us.
Quick pass me a spade! I`ve had another idea.
User avatar
Vincent
Future Tour Guide
 
Posts: 3179
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 12:29 pm
Location: Bedfordshire, England.

Postby badinfluence63 on Fri Feb 17, 2006 4:15 am

Out of curiosity, did the Japanese have the nautical prowess to make such a voyage?

Sincerely,

BI63
(OITS Member)
Whewww...where does the time go!
User avatar
badinfluence63
Treasure hunter
 
Posts: 7427
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 11:23 am
Location: New England and relatively close and accessible to Nova Scotia.

jap sailors

Postby Vincent on Fri Feb 17, 2006 7:31 pm

BI.

Good question!

to be honest i dont know, ill have a look at some point and see what i can find.
Quick pass me a spade! I`ve had another idea.
User avatar
Vincent
Future Tour Guide
 
Posts: 3179
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 12:29 pm
Location: Bedfordshire, England.

Postby badinfluence63 on Sat Feb 18, 2006 5:54 am

Vincent,

Thanks. I will internet work it too. I thought maybe someone in our well rounded forum knew.

Sincerely,

BI63
(OITS Member)
Whewww...where does the time go!
User avatar
badinfluence63
Treasure hunter
 
Posts: 7427
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 11:23 am
Location: New England and relatively close and accessible to Nova Scotia.

Postby badinfluence63 on Sat Feb 18, 2006 7:10 am

Okay, it was Chinese not Japanese that should have been the accurate question. According to the information below, travel was discouraged in Japan:

The Kaikinrei forbidding foreign travel by Japanese citizens imposed by the Tokugawa bakufu are quite specific in stating that the death penalty awaited anyone who left the country and tried to return. Japanese castaway experiences reveal that this law was rarely enforced. Over the course of the Tokugawa period, hundreds, even thousands, of Japanese left the country and returned. Further, it is often held that those who did return were imprisoned or stifled in their attempts to tell their stories. The fact remains that many eloquent hyôryûki accounts were told.

This paper looks at several castaway episodes, that described in Dattan Hyôryûki, and the experiences of Daikokuya Kodaiyu, Jukichi of the Tokujomaru, and Nakahama Manjiro. Set against these will be two cases where returned castaways were executed. By examining these episodes from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, I will clarify the variety and extent of the limitations placed on the activities of returned castaways. This, in turn, will reflect the willingness of the bakufu to engage these men as sources of information rather than to condemn them as criminals.


However as GK7 points out elsewhere the Chinese were out and about like everyone else:

http://www.meta-religion.com/Archaeolog ... at_out.htm

and further:

http://www.mcwetboy.net/maproom/2006/02 ... ersy.phtml

Sincerely,

BI63
(OITS Member)
Whewww...where does the time go!
User avatar
badinfluence63
Treasure hunter
 
Posts: 7427
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 11:23 am
Location: New England and relatively close and accessible to Nova Scotia.

Postby GrailKnight7 on Fri Mar 24, 2006 3:05 am

Hello all,

As a follow-up to the article that I posted on Feb 15th titled "Architect believes Chinese found Cape Breton", Terry Deveau of the NSExplore forum recently pointed out that the discoverer of the ruins, Paul Chiasson, has already written and published a book about it!

The book is called The Island of Seven Cities: Where the Chinese Settled When They Discovered North America and will be available on May 2nd.

Here is the book description from Amazon.com:
http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/tg/det ... -7899503#2

The gripping, marvel-filled account of how a native son took a casual walk up a mountain on Cape Breton Island and made an archeological discovery of world-shaking proportions.

In the summer of 2003, at home for his parents’ fiftieth wedding anniversary, Paul Chiasson decided to climb a mountain he had never explored on the island where eight generations of his Acadian family had lived. Cape Breton is one of the oldest points of exploration and settlement in the Americas, with a history dating back to the first days of European discovery, and it is littered with the remnants of old settlements. But the road that Chiasson found that day was unique. Well-made and consistently wide, and at one time clearly bordered with stone walls, the road had been a major undertaking. In the two years of detective work that followed, Chiasson systematically surveyed the history of Europeans in North America, and came to a stunning conclusion: the ruins he stumbled upon did not belong to the Portuguese, the French or the English – in fact, they pre-dated John Cabot’s “discovery” of the island in 1497.

Using aerial and site photographs, maps and drawings, and his own expertise as an architect, Chiasson carries the reader along as he pieces together the clues to one of the world’s great mysteries. While tantalizing mentions can be found in early navigators’ journals and maps, The Island of Seven Cities reveals for the first time the existence of a large Chinese colony that thrived on Canadian shores well before the European Age of Discovery.

Chiasson addresses how the colony was abandoned and forgotten, in the New World and in China, except in the storytelling and culture of the Mi’kmaq, whose written language, clothing, technical knowledge, religious beliefs and legends, he argues, expose deep cultural roots in China. The Island of Seven Cities unveils the first tangible proof that the Chinese were in the New World before Columbus.


Very interesting claims but I wonder if he really can offer any definitive proof? Judging by the author's credentials below, he certainly does seem credible.

About the Author
Paul Chiasson is a Yale-educated architect whose expertise is the history and theory of religious architecture. He was born on Cape Breton Island and is a direct descendent of the Acadians who were among the first European settlers in the New World. He has taught at Yale, at the Catholic University of America in Washington D.C. and at the University of Toronto. Chiasson’s discovery of the remains of an ancient Chinese settlement on Cape Breton Island is a direct result of his ancestral interest in the island’s history and of his unique ability to understand the unusual architectural forms that the ruins represented – remains that had been previously misunderstood or overlooked.


Rgds,
GK7
OITS Member
User avatar
GrailKnight7
Digging for Diamonds
 
Posts: 527
Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2005 8:34 pm
Location: Toronto, Canada

Postby Interested1 on Mon Mar 27, 2006 11:31 pm

Very interesting. Thankyou
Interested1
Digging for Clams
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2006 9:57 am
Location: Lancashire UK

Postby CBtreasurehunter on Mon May 15, 2006 12:28 am

I've seen those articles about the chinese in North America before everyone else. Sounds intriguing. In all of the articles I've read, nowhere's does it discuss the where abouts of the Chinese settlement. I'd love to take a day of and go exploring.
Has anyone on here been privy to such information? Also where abouts would a person research such things? I've found some very unusal rock and road workings and I'd like to find out their age.
User avatar
CBtreasurehunter
Digging for Gold
 
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 11:03 am

PreviousNext

Return to News & Press

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


Fatal error: ./cache/ is NOT writable. in /home/oakislan/public_html/forum/includes/acm/acm_file.php on line 103