The South Shore

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The South Shore

Postby RRD2 on Fri Mar 24, 2006 10:35 pm

Thank you, for your excellent aerial views and presentation on the Smith's Cove thread....

Evidence of a flood system was discovered on the South Shore on the afternoon of Nov. 3, 1965. Prior to this, there was a good deal of evidence to support the existence of a flood tunnel other than the one at Smith's Cove. Searchers that were unable to stem the flow of water from the cove were at a loss to understand why. At the cove, Fredrick Blair detonated an enormous amount of dynamite in an attempt to plug the tunnel and disable the system. He may have destroyed part of the works there, but water continued to flood the Money Pit.

Blair then used red dye to find the inlet of the drain system so that wherever red spots on the beach or close off-shore could be identified, they could proceed to block the ocean access. It was not as he expected, for the dye appeared at the South Shore. Chappell also used the dye tests and the results were the same - red dye appeared in three separate areas coming up on the shore. Nothing was discovered there until RDI began searching late in 1965.

The original South Shore shaft (similar to the one found at the cove) was excavated to a depth of 60 feet when sea water rushed in. This shaft presented the same features that other original shafts had, and was easily attributed to the depositors. What was different here was that this system was much deeper. The shaft was 8 feet square and comprised of beach rock, sand, eel grass and other vegetation. The stone triangle was a short distance away from the shaft, with the base of it parallel to the landward side of the shaft.

The system was left open while excavation began at the Money Pit. Electric pumps in the sump of the Heddon shaft kept the water under control although it was estimated that 150+ gallons per minute were entering in just from the South Shore flood system. Further excavation in this area by Dan Blankenship reached a depth of 83 feet and salt water continued at a greater rate. A new source of water was seen to enter from the east side in a 3 inch stream. Notably, Dan recovered an old hand-hammered nail at 75 feet during this excavation, which easily dates prior to the discovery of the MP.

The flood and drain system at the South Shore is likely more complex and certainly deeper than the one at the cove. Please refer to page 6 of the Smith's Cove thread for n4N's related images and noted anomalies which may apply to the system here.



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Postby RRD2 on Sat Mar 25, 2006 7:52 pm

It would appear from the evidence reviewed so far that there are three distinct drains on the South Shore, in contrast with the five finger drains that were discovered at the cove.

It is unclear if these three drains run parallel to each other, or if they converge as those at the cove. It is apparent, however, that they are substantially larger than the box drains and perhaps deeper. At least the tunnel behind the junction of these drains is deeper than that near Smith's Cove.


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Postby badinfluence63 on Sat Mar 25, 2006 9:57 pm

RDII,

Thanks a bunch n4!!!

Looking at those pictures leaves one convinced, that the underwater soil buildup that you can see, something was done there.

An island has either a gradual or radical drop from the main island NOT a build up. Correct me if I'm wrong. Especially given the over time wear of the ebb and flow of the tide.

Sincerely,

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Postby badinfluence63 on Sat Mar 25, 2006 11:13 pm

n4,

BI, what I'm proposing is no drop


Thats what I was trying to say but didn't write it. There is an obvious build up where there shouldn't be under normal circumstances.

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Postby RRD2 on Sat Mar 25, 2006 11:27 pm

Now that has pointed this out, there is obviously something going on there. Currents, tides and storms probably changed the shape of what was done, but it does appear to the layman's eye that an effort was made to alter the shoreline.

Way back in the Frobischer thread, Hanson acknowledged that RDI noted smaller clastics on the South Shore. I will need to find the related documents which support this idea and what they indicate.

It is also important now to view the image of ice holes that appeared off the South Shore to see how they are possibly related...


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Postby Bonnie on Sun Mar 26, 2006 4:33 pm

RRD2, I didnt know exactly where to post this. I just wanted tell you that i am reading all of the research you are sharing. and i want to tell you thank for you taking your time to do this. it is alot of important information i havent read before and i dont have any contribution to it as i am learning and thinking. but i want to tell you i sure apreciate this research sharing. thank you very much.
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Postby RRD2 on Sun Mar 26, 2006 5:29 pm

Thanks, Bonnie...

You're a sweetheart and we all love you..



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