The mysterious Oak trees....

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trees

Postby Vincent on Fri Jan 20, 2006 10:02 pm

RRD2.

if theres anything i can do to help in anyway just say so.

i have had a lot from this forum, any chance i get to put something back will be siezed with both hands. :wink:

ps, ill stick my neck out on this one but i bet you a beer(cold of course) that the origins of the tree are not quite what we all expect, im not making an assertion here but i suspect a possible hybrid link to a tree grown in africa or of african origin might just turn up!

i personaly think this tree and its kin came from europe, but had gentic influences elsewhere!

time will tell. :wink:
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Postby Bonnie on Sat Jan 21, 2006 2:38 am

the main sets of trees i have viewed researching the internet that appear somewhat remotely similar in image form are the berwick scotland act of union trees and the st. davids woods trees in wales. both acts of union trees. commemorative european trees.
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Postby badinfluence63 on Sat Jan 21, 2006 7:02 pm

Those Oak trees from Oak Island, for me, have that African Serengetta Plains cropped look to them. Almost deformed looking when you compare to the usual full and generous leafed ones that most are familiar with.

Vincent, you may be on to something.

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Trees

Postby Vincent on Sat Jan 21, 2006 7:46 pm

BI.
Those Oak trees from Oak Island, for me, have that African Serengetta Plains cropped look to them. Almost deformed looking when you compare to the usual full and generous leafed ones that most are familiar with


Quite. Of all the oaks ive ever seen here in england they are generally short very stocky with a full rounded crown that can reach as low as head height.
The african connecting came from the following theories of mine.
1. as you pointed out they do bare a stricking resembelence to the familar view of the serrengetti, these trees have evolved over time to produce there canopy beyond the reach of ground based herbivores, giraffes etc.
2. the leaves of the oaks on OI were i believe said to have a red hue during autumn, as far as the oaks here are concerened they generally turn gold/sandy brown.
3.when i was following the thread of the tunnels found in madagascar im certain i saw on a madagascar web site a picture of a grave yard, said to be a pirates grave yard and the floor (if memory serves) was covered in red leaves not that dissimilar to an oak leaf.

granted this is a bit tenuous but nothing about OI appears to be set in stone.
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Re: Trees

Postby Ken on Sat Jan 21, 2006 9:13 pm

Vincent wrote:2. the leaves of the oaks on OI were i believe said to have a red hue during autumn, as far as the oaks here are concerened they generally turn gold/sandy brown.
3.when i was following the thread of the tunnels found in madagascar im certain i saw on a madagascar web site a picture of a grave yard, said to be a pirates grave yard and the floor (if memory serves) was covered in red leaves not that dissimilar to an oak leaf.


Having grown up in Nova Scotia, I always assumed that leaves change to the same colours everywhere in the autumn, but that is not the case. I am used to seeing hillsides covered in beautiful hues of gold and red. But my brother and his wife, transplanted Nova Scotians living in Winnipeg, Manitoba, long to see red leaves in the autumn - the trees there turn only gold or yellow, no red. In fact, when Mrs. Ken and I went out to visit them in November we actually took a small box of red leaves out. Their kids and grandkids were quite impressed.

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Postby Vincent on Sat Jan 21, 2006 9:36 pm

Ken.

This is one point i didnt touch on and, its a long shot but i believe that leaf colour in autumn may be due to mineral deposits gained through a year in the trees life, different salts and proteins etc found in the local soil may be a contributing factor towards leaf colour as the tree sucks down its sap to prepare for winter, however geneticaly some trees may just wilt/dry up in the same way the world over. trees in africa are not subjected to the winter process as we know it so this is why i see my previous post as a bit tenuous.
another theory of mine and this you can look up for yourself if you wish, was that when i used to live in south east london(sydenham) there was a small wood near by that local legend has it produced the oak timbers for drakes `golden hind`, the reason for this is that the particular wood was one of the highest points in southern england and as such produced the strongest oaks, as being high up there where battered by wind and as such had grown to withstand such a force thus producing good quality strong timber.
the oaks on OI however were tall, spindly and appear not to exhibit the ability to withstand strong winds, odd when you consider the gails they must have got coming in from the atlantic.

i personaly cant wait for the results to come back, im not interested in being right but i think the OI oaks have a little tale to tell all of their own.

for what its worth the small wood was called`dulwich hill woods` a famous diaryist(not samuel peeps, but about the same period)was mugged/robbed there once....typical for SE london :D
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Postby acdonah on Mon Jan 23, 2006 11:52 am

Hi All,

The color of the leaves, although predetermined by nature, is affected by the amount of water, sun, etc. it gets during the growing process during the summer. For example, This fall, we usually see alot of reds, but due t all the wet weather this fall the reds were almost nonexistent.

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Postby badinfluence63 on Mon Mar 06, 2006 9:42 am

I wish I could have remembered that I had read about the oak trees on Oak Island before. Such is the information overload to a sieve of a mind like mine:

The native red oaks like the one that first drew attention to the treasure site have a life span of about two hundred and fifty years, according to Nova Scotian foresters, so the Norsemen were long gone when the tree at the Money Pit sprouted. It is equally irresponsible to suggest that the Incas, with all those rugged mountains close to home would carry their treasure through hundreds of miles of Spaniard infested seas to deposit their gold on an island in an area that they had never heard of.


Taken from Laverne Johnson's writings.

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