Who made it?

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Who made it?

Postby OI-Fan on Wed Nov 18, 2009 5:23 pm

I have read books and also discussed Oak Island with locals and have heard a wide range of theories about who may have did this and why.

Has anyone ever dated the coconut fibers found in the pit?

It is obvious a large team did this. Military? Large group of pirates? If indeed a large team was involved it is doubtful they could keep a secret. IMO whoever built the pit and its surrounding structures left the island and was involved in a ship wreck forever keeping the secret.

Has anyone ever made a correlation between ship wrecks dated before the initial discovery of the pit in the late 1700s and the island? Most of us have heard theories about the Templars and other possible connections such as the spoils of Jamaica that went missing etc.

I feel that some clues could be gained about Oak Island from ship wrecks in the area. What are your thoughts on this?
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Re: Who made it?

Postby Jo on Wed Nov 18, 2009 5:29 pm

Here's a link to the carbon dating reports for the coconut fibre which I think you'll find interesting: http://www.oakislandtreasure.co.uk/cont ... w/218/176/

They're courtesy of D'Acry O'Connor who has been kindly sharing his research files with us online.
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Re: Who made it?

Postby Vincent on Thu Nov 19, 2009 2:56 pm

OI-Fan wrote:IMO whoever built the pit and its surrounding structures left the island and was involved in a ship wreck forever keeping the secret.


That is most likely the case, clearly there was human activity on the island which involved a lot of digging, however, there remains to this day no known written accounts of exactly what happened.
D'Arcy O'Connor once speculated in his book "The secret treasure of Oak island" that a damaged treasure fleet ship was blown of course and eventually landed near OI, they deposited their load and attempted to return home with a view to returning as soon as they could to reclaim their treasure, alas however they were lost at sea. The more I think about it the more this seems to be the most logical explanation.
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Re: Who made it?

Postby JodyLane3 on Mon Mar 26, 2012 8:04 pm

I agree with you. I think if the depositors had made it back home and yet failed for some reason to get back to OI there would have been some legend develop in Europe about the island.
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Re: Who made it?

Postby wayward on Tue Mar 27, 2012 10:59 am

The dating of the coconut fibre is somewhat important to my own theory. A date of sometime in the 12th century (from the letter dated Oct. 6 1993) for the gathering of these fibres (not necessarily the time they appeared on Oak Island) fits in very well with an extended theory of Templars gathering items from the old temple mount in Jerusalem in 1118-1128. IMHO, that was their only purpose when first founded and for the next 9 years. I have read many and varied theorys concerning the coconut fibres, but I would like to ask which is the most accepted of these theory's today?
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Re: Who made it?

Postby D'Arcy on Tue Mar 27, 2012 5:53 pm

wayward wrote:The dating of the coconut fibre is somewhat important to my own theory. A date of sometime in the 12th century (from the letter dated Oct. 6 1993) for the gathering of these fibres (not necessarily the time they appeared on Oak Island) fits in very well with an extended theory of Templars gathering items from the old temple mount in Jerusalem in 1118-1128. IMHO, that was their only purpose when first founded and for the next 9 years. I have read many and varied theorys concerning the coconut fibres, but I would like to ask which is the most accepted of these theory's today?


That it was probably "dunnage" from the hold of a ship or ships. Vessels transporting cargo from the West Indies or West Africa in the 16th through18th centuries commonly used the outer husks ("coir") of coconuts as packing material, both to keep cargo from shifting and to absorb bilge water. Piles of this otherwise useless material can readily be found on any tropical beach where coconuts had been harvested.
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Re: Who made it?

Postby wayward on Tue Mar 27, 2012 8:41 pm

D'Arcy wrote:
wayward wrote:The dating of the coconut fibre is somewhat important to my own theory. A date of sometime in the 12th century (from the letter dated Oct. 6 1993) for the gathering of these fibres (not necessarily the time they appeared on Oak Island) fits in very well with an extended theory of Templars gathering items from the old temple mount in Jerusalem in 1118-1128. IMHO, that was their only purpose when first founded and for the next 9 years. I have read many and varied theorys concerning the coconut fibres, but I would like to ask which is the most accepted of these theory's today?

That it was probably "dunnage" from the hold of a ship or ships. Vessels transporting cargo from the West Indies or West Africa in the 16th through18th centuries commonly used the outer husks ("coir") of coconuts as packing material, both to keep cargo from shifting and to absorb bilge water. Piles of this otherwise useless material can readily be found on any tropical beach where coconuts had been harvested.


Thanks for the reply D'Arcy, although I do have a couple of questions. Firstly, Woods Hole analyzed the fibers and specifically mentioned a possible Mediterranean origin. The dating of 1130 +- 70 is some 400 years earlier then the 16th century, it would seem to me the fibers would be rotten if usable at all. I would think that coconut fibers being swept up on the beach to be used as dunnage would be more in the 10 to 20 year old period. I too premise it was used as dunnage but from a much earlier period, as a matter of fact about the middle to the late 12th century. Do you think any of this possible?
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Re: Who made it?

Postby D'Arcy on Tue Mar 27, 2012 9:39 pm

No, because the final WO report warns that the carbon-dating results, based on the samples they tested, are "highly speculative" and "cannot be trusted". In addition, I have never seen any historical evidence showing the use of coir as ship's dunnage prior to the late 15th century.
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Re: Who made it?

Postby JodyLane3 on Tue Mar 27, 2012 10:09 pm

Just curious D'Arcy. Is there still a boatload, pardon the expression, of coconut fiber underneath the man-made beach at Smith's Cove or has most of it been cleared out by the exploration efforts?
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Re: Who made it?

Postby DJ King on Wed Mar 28, 2012 12:33 am

We should also be mindful of Paul Wroclawski's theory that the so-called coconut fibre may well be a local form of vegetable matter that just looks like coconut husk: see his posting at this link
viewtopic.php?f=12&t=3697&p=68710&hilit=+coconut#p68710
where he says:

Considering the coconut palm is not indigenous to the east coast of the Americas and was actually transplanted by the Spanish, I suggest this sample was not coconut. Queensland beach in St Margaret’s Bay has volumes of material that appears identical to the coconut fibers; however, it is local; read George Young's Ancient Peoples and Modern Ghosts.

See also Paul's posting at this link where he details how various experts were unable to conclusively identify the material as coconut fibre:
viewtopic.php?f=10&t=4493&p=68698&hilit=+coconut#p68698


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