Deprecated: Function set_magic_quotes_runtime() is deprecated in /home/oakislan/public_html/forum/common.php on line 106
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 916: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /common.php:106)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 916: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /common.php:106)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/session.php on line 916: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /common.php:106)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/functions.php on line 3526: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /common.php:106)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/functions.php on line 3528: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /common.php:106)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/functions.php on line 3529: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /common.php:106)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/functions.php on line 3530: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /common.php:106)
Oak Island Treasure • View topic - A case against Cowley and Bontein

A case against Cowley and Bontein

Please post your theories for discussion here. Expect plenty of questions and devil's advocacy.

Moderators: Jo, admiralbenbow, Keeled_over

Postby PAUL HAWKINS on Sun Mar 02, 2008 10:51 pm

Graham,

As far as military secrecy is concerned it is amazing that closer to our own time 500 warships and 3000 landing craft appeared off the Normandy Coast on D-Day (June 6, 1944) and caught the Germans napping - and this was at a time when spies were all over the place.

At the same time World War II saw all manner of bunkers and tunnels built all over the place, right before everyone's eyes, and yet no-one knew anything except those responsible. With Oak Island the same thing!


Please treat your readers with a little more intelligence. You are not comparing like with like within your argument when you compare Oak Island with the D day landings, and the huge counter operation that took place then to hide the real intention ~ which was almost as big as the real opereration itself.

If that's your best answer of how to hide 150+ workers, daily supply of provisions, raw materials, pre-fabricated materials ~ (Smiths Cove numbered component pieces of timber) ~ together with the many ships that must have called in to Oak Island to supply this enterprize ~ then it is apparent that you have no real answer to D'Arcy's pertinent question.
Visita Interiora Terrae Rectificando Invenies Occultum Lapidem
User avatar
PAUL HAWKINS
Digging for Diamonds
 
Posts: 413
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2003 10:18 pm
Location: BRISTOL UK

Postby n4n224ccw on Mon Mar 03, 2008 12:03 am

The rapid increase of settlement in Nova Scotia from the time of Halifax and beyond, placed a tremendous strain on surveying resources. During several occasions in the later half of the 1700, we can read of numerous times where the lack of surveyors hindered settlement.

Military men were one such resource to employ for this work. We know Capt Charles Morris and even Col Robert Archibald were employed for this shortfall.

The town map produced by William Bontein of Annapolis and dated Oct 1754 shows he too was employed in this capacity.

http://data4.collectionscanada.ca/netac ... l&r=38&f=G

I really wonder how much time he took to survey, then to prepare the map, and finally complete the map in Oct 1754? Notice he did not use his military rank and is therefore consistent to him being a civilian.

This week I will be reviewing the correspondence between Halifax and Annapolis to show this was indeed the case for William Bontein.
The post Revolutionary history of Oak Island is a complex web of lies and partial truths to sort through.

http://www.oakislandtheories.com
User avatar
n4n224ccw
Digging for Diamonds
 
Posts: 718
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2007 3:12 pm
Location: Halifax Nova Scotia

Postby Graham Harris on Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:51 pm

The information provided by N4N in his contribution of February 29th, concerning the granting of fishing licenses in Mahone Bay in the period of interest (1753-54), is information of which I was unaware. For this N4N must be complimented. However, a different light can be shed upon the facts and a more valid conclusion drawn to that implied.

I am by profession more a mining engineer than a grocer or provision merchant. Accordingly, I have given scant regard to victualling problems, whether these be military or civilian. Browsing through the archives one comes across long lists of provisions dispatched courtesy of the British Government to Nova Scotia in those days of early settlement. The lists make dreary reading - beef, pork, fish, peas, bread, molasses, beer, rum, etc, etc. Mainstays of life perhaps, but not very appetising (except for the rum!), and some of the provisions were probably far from being in prime condition by the time they arrived. Much originated in England, supplemented by provisions dispatched from Boston. The government set meagre allowances of food which provoked a great deal of distress among the settlers, whether at Halifax or Lunenburg, some deserting as a result.

Colonel Lawrence writes from Lunenburg on July 7th, 1753 (rather sarcastically) - "It is true we have wood and water and our sea wants not fish. But we have no marriages in Cana [where water was turned to wine - see the Gospel of John, Chap. 2] nor any wonderful draughts [see the Gospel of Luke Chap. 5 where the fishing nets broke from the abundance of fish]." Four days later (July 11th) he writes again - "Victuals above all things they [the settlers] are in absolute want of and as I observed in an earlier letter being unable to subsist for seven days on an allowance sufficient for four or five .....We cannot build houses, cut timber, and take fish at the same time." He makes pleas for "allowing bread in lieu of some part of the beef, that you will go still farther and let [permit] the addition of two pounds of bread per week with molasses, striking off the rum." With approximately 2000 mouths to feed at Lunenburg (settlers and military) Lawrence was faced with a problem, one that would be compounded in that first winter of 1753-54. I know nothing of the land clearances around Lunenburg, or the rate at which previously forested land was gradually brought under productive cultivation, but I am prepared to bet that precious little was produced by the settlers for their own consumption before the onset of that first winter. The plight of the settlers must have been desperate with the prospects of imminent starvation a constant anxiety.

The granting of fishing licences in December 1753, with specific reference to what are now known as Gifford, Young and Oak Islands (based upon N4N's information) must be viewed against this backdrop. I know little of fishing (even though I've caught a few trout) but these islands lie close inshore and shallower waters favour certain species in abundance. It must be concluded, therefore, that the purpose of the licences was to supplement government issued rations for both the military and civilian populations. It seems reasonable to presume that Lunenburg Bay would have been reserved for fishing by the settlers (when they had boats). Interestingly enough there was a George Young who was granted land under the terms of the Shoreham Grant (1759) and I presume Young Island, in Mahone Bay, was his island.

What the fisherman may have been told as to 'who' may have been on Oak Island, or 'what' they were doing, will never be known. After all the military were in control of the area and the military rarely gives reasons for what it does, particularly if its reasons are clandestine and in the 'national interest'. It reminds me of the nuclear facilities at Dimona, Israel. When construction began in 1957 it was put out that a shoe factory was being built. For some years that belief persisted among the local population, though suspicions may have grown regarding its real purpose. It was only in October 1986 (almost 30 years later) that the true story emerged when Mordechai Vanunu, a worker at the facility, spilt the beans to London newspapers. Since then he's been in prison or under house arrest. In connection with the Dimona reactor the curious may wish to look at the circumstances of the Nairobi aircrash of 20 November 1974, and its sequel at the same airport on 25 January 1976. The subterfuge of the British military cover-up on Oak Island pales into insignificance.

I would like to thank N4N for bringing his information to my attention. I now have a greater appreciation of the difficulties faced by Colonel Lawrence that first year regarding the supply of provisions to the struggling settlement of Lunenburg.

Graham Harris
Graham Harris
Digging for Coal
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2005 4:58 pm
Location: PEI, Canada

Postby n4n224ccw on Thu Mar 06, 2008 3:05 am

Just to add some information on Bontein, he was at Louisburg in 1758 where he made a map.

Item 45 at the link below

http://fortress.uccb.ns.ca/search/HH49.html

He was also taken prisoner by the French.

http://fortress.uccb.ns.ca/search/Gordon.html

It seems odd for the British to allow even the slightest possibiliy of Bontein being captured by the enemy.
The post Revolutionary history of Oak Island is a complex web of lies and partial truths to sort through.

http://www.oakislandtheories.com
User avatar
n4n224ccw
Digging for Diamonds
 
Posts: 718
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2007 3:12 pm
Location: Halifax Nova Scotia

Postby n4n224ccw on Thu Mar 06, 2008 10:48 pm

PANS Reel 15272

from the Secretary's Office 1 Jul 1754 to Capt Handfield, Commanding Officer at Annapolis.

...The Col (Lawrence) has heard from Mr. Cowley concerning the state of the Garrison (Annapolis).

In another letter of the same day to Mr. Cowley,

I am ordered by the Commander in Chief to acknowledge his receipt of the state of that Garrison.

It seems to me that Cowley was writing to Lawrence from Annapolis and receiving letters in Annapolis before and after 1 July 1754.
The post Revolutionary history of Oak Island is a complex web of lies and partial truths to sort through.

http://www.oakislandtheories.com
User avatar
n4n224ccw
Digging for Diamonds
 
Posts: 718
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2007 3:12 pm
Location: Halifax Nova Scotia

Postby anchors away on Sun Mar 09, 2008 2:04 am

n4n224ccw wrote:Mr. Harris,

Are you aware the island was granted to John Gifford and Richard Smith on 27 Dec 1753? They were granted three islands that day (12, 13, 28 or modern day Gifford, Young, and Oak) for the purpose of fishing, with yet a second company from New York being granted yet another island.

An article in the Halifax Gazette on 4 May 1754 shows the company arrived with men and supplies to commence fishing and farming.

The earliest document to date showing the islands with assigned numbers, reflects the above grants.


Instead of three teenagers finding the money pit [?] in 1795 I believe.
Might it have been J Gifford and R Smith. Who were being discovered in 1753
If the pits on OI were built as a military [hideout ] then the possible C.Morris and W.Nelson may have been the root of the plan.
I am not trying to discredit any of the findings here but we have to remember that off the record accounts could have been a top-secret
plan .
The article in the Halifax Gazette 4 May 1754 the company that arrived to do fishing and farming might just as well been the men who if this is a military cover-up dug the underground trenches designed to do nothing but flood as a means of escaping the truth. :idea:
User avatar
anchors away
Digging for Diamonds
 
Posts: 283
Joined: Fri Nov 30, 2007 8:29 pm
Location: treasure patch

Postby Graham Harris on Mon Mar 10, 2008 5:36 pm

The following may prove useful to those interested in researching the military careers and activities of William Bontein and William Cowley while serving in Nova Scotia, the information therein having been obtained from archival sources at the Corps of Royal Engineers, the British Library and the National Archives, London. The opportunity has been taken to include some details on John Henry Bastide, who was their immediate engineering superior. These extracts have been taken from The Oak Island Treasure: The Military Cover-up 1752-54, which was produced to support my address at the Oak Island Days weekend (August 2007). Some of this may have been included in previous postings. Any new information would be warmly welcomed.

(1) The War in Flanders and Nova Scotia
Bontein served with distinction in Flanders during hostilities in what is now known as the War of the Austrian Succession (1744-48). In one of the actions he was responsible for mining the defences of a British position, and accomplished this with devastating results. Two reports are available. These are:
(a) Gentleman's Magazine, Vol. XVII, 1747 - “.... the [French] besiegers attacked the lunette of Zealand, but had 200 men blown up, and great part of their works ruined by a mine, they advanced however to the assault, but were repulsed, and also a second time; the action lasted two hours, with a continual fire from the cannon and musketry.”
(b) London Gazette, August 17, 1747 - “Bergen-op-Zoom. On Monday between 11 and 12 at night enemy made an assault upon the lunette of Zealand ....... Captain Bouquoin [Bontein] took their measures so well that they sprang a mine situated in the French works on the side of the covered way ....... [the enemy] lost above 200 men and a great part of their works was raised”.
In the course of the action Bontein was wounded in the shoulder.
The order of June 12, 1752, for Bontein to proceed to Annapolis via Camborne suggests the likely purpose of his trip was to recruit or pick up a group of previously selected miners. It also raises the question of ongoing transportation. An immigrant ship, the Gale (90 tons - master Thomas Casson), departed Rotterdam early June 1752, and arrived at Falmouth, the nearest port to Camborne, on June 28th. The sixteen day period between receiving his orders in London and the arrival of the Gale at Falmouth, would have been sufficient for Bontein to travel to Cornwall and prepare men and equipment for the ongoing voyage. The Gale sailed four days later on July 2nd, 1752 bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia where it arrived on September 15th. The voyage took 110 days, a lot longer than usual, with 29 deaths during the passage.
Immigrant ships were far from commodious, space being always at a premium as the ship owner made his money by transporting as many souls as could be crammed aboard. The settlers were allocated space according to sex and age, and the records indicate no space left unoccupied on previous or subsequent sailings of the Gale. However, for the June sailing of 1752 it is estimated 16 adult berths remained vacant on departure from Rotterdam. All immigrant ships had to clear formalities at Portsmouth before proceeding to Nova Scotia, and it may be presumed the Gale did this before entering Falmouth. There is no record of who took passage from Falmouth, but it may be assumed that William Bontein and his Cornish miners were the group involved, and this accounts for the 16 vacant berths.
In 1752, Halifax was being actively settled with a view to establishing it as a centre of British military power. It would be reasonable to expect that Bontein, with his tunnelling expertise and skilled miners would be directed there, instead of to Annapolis, whose days were numbered as a centre of colonial administration. However, at Annapolis there was another engineer, older and more senior to Bontein. His name was William Cowley, the chief engineer. Cowley was a stone mason by profession, but had gained the confidence of his superiors in constructing wharves and maritime defence works during a prior assignment at Minorca in the Mediterranean. He had been sent to Annapolis in 1743, and arrived in time to help bolster the fort’s defences from French and Indian attack.

(2) The Arrest of William Bontein, His Marriage and Death
One incident in the military career of William Bontein is of above-average interest - his arrest in November 1754, following which he was kept in close confinement for at least the next seven months. He was threatened with a court martial, but for whatever reason remains unknown. There are two letters relating to the incident. These are:-
(a) Letter dated November 19th from Captain John Handfield at Annapolis Royal to Lt-Colonel Charles Lawrence, Acting Governor, to the effect that Bontein had been confined awaiting court martial, because “he was an engineer who did not consider himself under tight military discipline and denied his subserviency to Captain Handfield”.
(b) Letter dated November 26th replying to the above requesting that Bontein be permitted to “walk about”.
The threatened court martial had not taken place by the following May (1755)and, it is doubted whether it took place at all. What was it all about? William Cowley died about the same time as Bontein was placed under close arrest, and it is not unlikely the two incidents were related. Bontein was later to marry Cowley’s widow and have at least one child by her. This act suggests a close degree of companionship existed between the two men. Cowley was 63 years of age at his death and had served the army as an engineer for forty-eight of those years. Bontein emerges as a strong minded individual of independent thought and action, traits of character well suited to a mining engineer toiling away in dark and dismal places far underground, but such traits are little respected by military disciplinarians. It is, therefore, highly likely that Bontein, a man unprepared to tolerate fools gladly, allowed his mouth to get ahead of his brain when dealing with Captain Handfield, a man whose official rank would have been most important. Perhaps Handfield, sensing something going on behind his back (namely Oak Island), was trying to worm information out of Bontein, information that Bontein had sworn to keep secret. As will be argued later it is difficult to believe that Handfield, or any of the 40th Foot, would have been involved on Oak Island.
It is ironic that in marrying Cowley’s widow, Susannah Winniett, Bontein became related by marriage to his nemesis, Captain John Handfield, who had married Elizabeth Winniett, an older sister. Bontein was under close arrest in May 1755 when preparations were underway to mount the attack on Fort Beausejour, but he did participate in the Battle of Louisburg in 1758 when he suffered the ignominy of being captured and temporarily held prisoner-of-war. Preparatory to taking ship back to England in the fall of 1760 Bontein and his wife stayed with Governor Charles Lawrence at his house in Halifax, where she gave birth. The voyage back to England was tragic as the ship they were on was taken by French privateers. The following comment is found in Connolly’s notes:-
Engineer Extraordinary in our service in North America, on his passage to England with his wife and 4 small children, taken by a French privateer and being obliged to go on board the said enemy's ship was, in a violent storm, before he could reach it, overset and drowned, leaving his wife and children to be carried prisoners to Spain, having been plundered of all their effects and reduced to extreme want. Widow to be allowed £20 a year from January 1, 1762.

(3) The Corps of Sappers and Miners
Prior to its full integration into the British Army in 1757, the Corps adopted the following designations, regardless of whether its members also possessed officer rank. The figures in brackets indicate the number of members in that specific category as of 1748:- Chief Engineer (1); Directors (2); Sub-Directors (2); Engineers-in-Ordinary (6); Engineers-Extraordinary (6); Sub-Engineers (6); Practitioner-Engineers (6). As may be seen the Corps was very small, possessing a total of 29 members.
Where military rank was held by those included in this appendix, the rank given is that held during the period of interest.
The service of army officers to their regiments was often lifelong, Bastide’s service being a case in point. A regimental return for 1767 was found listing some of the more ancient officers, who were all between 71 and 82 years of age, two of whom were described as ‘stone blind’, with the added phrase ‘if they cannot march then they are to be put in carts’.

(4) Captain John Henry Bastide
John Bastide was born about 1698, the son of a French military officer. His father, Colonel Armand de la Bastide, had sought refuge in Britain from religious persecution, and was given command of Count Nassau’s Regiment. Colonel Armand de la Bastide later became Governor of the Isle of Wight.
John Bastide joined the army as a boy in 1711, a notation in George I’s Army Lists describes him as a ‘child’. He attained the rank of Lieutenant-General shortly before his death in 1770 following almost sixty years of uninterrupted service. He was appointed Director of the Corps of Sappers and Miners in 1748, being third in overall seniority, as well as being Chief Engineer for North America. After the death of Colonel Thomas Lascelles, Bastide assumed direct command of the Corps’ activities in North America during Anglo-French hostilities related to The Seven Years War (1756-63).
During the period 1718-20 Bastide was in Scotland, being a participant in the Battle of Genshiels (June 1719), and during 1726-41 was stationed in the Channel Islands where he undertook numerous engineering surveys, designs and constructions. In 1741 he was transferred to Annapolis Royal as Chief Engineer, and thereon commenced a long, virtually unbroken, relationship with British military interests in North America. In 1745 he participated in the capture of Louisburg, and was appointed resident engineer for its subsequent reconstruction, following which he was appointed Chief Engineer for Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Between 1751 and 1754 he is reported to have been ‘on vacation’, a period identified as being contemporary with the construction of the Flood Tunnel, and its ancillary works, upon Oak Island.
Between 1754 and 1756 Bastide was at Minorca, but returned to Nova Scotia to be Chief Engineer at the Siege of Louisburg (June 1758), on this occasion he was more intent on demolition than reconstruction. Following this he played a prominent role in the construction of Halifax Citadel and the defences to Halifax Harbour.

(5) William Bontein (1726-c60)
William Bontein was born at Killearn, Stirlingshire, Scotland. There is a suggestion his family owned interests in a coal mine, and his exposure to mining is likely to have begun at a very early age. His elder brother, Archibald (1709-73), was already a military engineer, and it is possible this influenced his joining the army in 1745/46 as a ‘cadet gunner’ in the War in Flanders. In 1747 he took charge of mining the defences of the lunette of Zealand with devastating consequences to the enemy, as has been related, and during this fierce action he was seriously wounded.
In 1748 Bontein was appointed a ‘practitioner engineer’ (the lowest rank in the corps), presumably as a result of the proficiency he had demonstrated in tunnelling and placing mines on the battlefield. In 1752 he was given his ‘marching orders’ to proceed to Annapolis Royal under unusual circumstances as has been described. The excavation of the Flood Tunnel upon Oak Island must be considered the highlight of Bontein’s career. In 1753, at a time when Flood Tunnel excavation was likely well underway he received promotion to ‘sub-engineer’.
But for being under close arrest at the time of William Cowley’s death, it is virtually certain Bontein would have succeeded him as chief engineer at Annapolis Royal in 1754. In 1757, when military officer rank was conferred upon civilian engineers in the corps, Bontein was appointed to the rank of lieutenant, and a year later promoted to captain-lieutenant.
Bontein spent his entire career in North America associated with the military establishment at Annapolis Royal. He participated in only one military action as far as is known, and that was the assault on Louisburg in 1748, during which he was captured and, for a short time, languished as a prisoner-of-war. His early death by drowning (c1760) was a tragic event by any yardstick of comparison, when it left his widow and four children to suffer the discomforts of imprisonment in a Spanish jail. Tragically lost in the same incident were his personal effects which, no doubt, would have included his personal diaries and records of the excavation of the Flood Tunnel.

(6) William Cowley (1691-1754)
William Cowley was born at Wingerworth, Derbyshire. In 1743 he is described as being a ‘master-mason’. From this it may be assumed he had some early acquaintance with quarrying and stone-working as his birth-place is in a part of Derbyshire where quarrying was a major occupation. In 1706 he joined the army and sailed to Gibraltar and Minorca, as these had fallen as spoils to the British following hostilities with Spain.
In Minorca, where he spent upwards of 20 years, he was involved in sea wall construction. In 1743 he was recommended to be appointed to the position of ‘practitioner engineer’, his work being praised by Colonel Thomas Lascelles, recently appointed Chief Engineer of Great Britain. It does not appear Cowley ever held military rank during his 48 years of being associated with the army. But for his early death he would certainly have been appointed to the military rank of captain, or possibly higher, when officer status was eventually conferred upon engineers in the British army in 1757.
In 1743 Cowley was transferred to Annapolis Royal in time to help bolster the defences against a combined French-Indian assault, being promoted to ‘engineer extraordinary’ in 1744. In 1745 he accompanied Bastide to Louisburg, returning to Annapolis Royal as chief engineer while Bastide remained at Louisburg supervising its reconstruction. In 1748/49 Cowley was promoted to ‘engineer ordinary’ on 10/- per day, his rate being increased to 15/- per day the following year. In 1751, immediately prior to when work is anticipated as having begun in earnest upon the Oak Island Flood Tunnel, Cowley was promoted to ‘engineer-in-ordinary’.
Though Cowley’s military records are fairly well documented there is a twelve month gap prior to his death in November 1754.

Graham Harris
Graham Harris
Digging for Coal
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2005 4:58 pm
Location: PEI, Canada

Postby anchors away on Mon Mar 10, 2008 7:17 pm

Graham Harris
My family sailed from Eng. to Halifax in the year 1752 [100]day sail . In my post division 32 there is mention of the sail .{The Sally] was the name of the ship.
I do not like to write and read about such affairs but like I keep saying there are so many off-record situations that when a written account does make it's way to the public it should be respected.

these accounts are very interesting
my personal thoughts are there may be some clues here to the defense of OIsland . Did these men know about the tunnel netwok on the island [OI] .
I have to study this a bit more or maybe if possible piece together the years that involve OI.
anchors away 8)
User avatar
anchors away
Digging for Diamonds
 
Posts: 283
Joined: Fri Nov 30, 2007 8:29 pm
Location: treasure patch

Postby anchors away on Thu Mar 13, 2008 1:11 am

He appears to be influenced by the Rule of King George 1 and 111.
Francis Bacon enters the House of Commons at the age of 23 .[32].or at least
is recorded this way .
[1561-1626]
Captain J. Bastide is on the scene only 71 years later according to these records .
User avatar
anchors away
Digging for Diamonds
 
Posts: 283
Joined: Fri Nov 30, 2007 8:29 pm
Location: treasure patch

Postby anchors away on Tue Mar 18, 2008 2:06 am

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Chamber
I found this very interesting "John Dee" was charged with treason for charting horoscopes for i believe queen mary and some other royal figures but then was cleared of the charges . It is very dificult to get the story straight with the royals .
Another thing I have learned in the last couple of days is :
I did some cypher work from page 128 in Mark Finnan book Oak Island
Secrets .[ symbols ] I have not completly finished the cypher but It's looking like
I found possibly some of the measurements to do with the design of the money pit on the island [OI]. I am trying to find out who constructed it by studing the cypher .
Who ever did the work knew about the undergrond tunnel then they dug down to those levels situtated the shaft in it's position where it is today ..then worked their way to the surface ..layer by layer designing an experimental shaft hopefully for the discovery of mercury or silver and whatever else they could find in those days . I believe around the year 1610 this could have taken place .
Plus maybe planted a Oak tree to mark
their spot .
As my cypher is not completed these are the FINDINGs for now .
What a day it will be when this mystery is solved .
I feel that time is coming .
I will post my cypher when it is completed ..
User avatar
anchors away
Digging for Diamonds
 
Posts: 283
Joined: Fri Nov 30, 2007 8:29 pm
Location: treasure patch

PreviousNext

Return to Your Theories

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron

Fatal error: ./cache/ is NOT writable. in /home/oakislan/public_html/forum/includes/acm/acm_file.php on line 103